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Llanfaes (Friary)

Order: Franciscans

The friary was founded by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in memory of his wife Joan (d. 1237), who was the daughter of King John. What is thought to be her tomb stone now lies in SS Mary and Nicholas' Church, Beaumaris see image. The stall-work at Beaumaris may also have come from the friary.

The name 'Llanfaes' is thought to come from 'mes', the Welsh for acorn, and indeed a number of tiles found on the site bear an oak leaf or acorn leaf motif. View tiles

show details of standing remains

Medieval Diocese: Llandaff
Lordship at foundation: Gwynedd

Main events in the history of this site

c.1237Foundation - The friary was founded by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth as a memorial to his wife, Joan (Siwan), who died in 1237. [7 sources]
1284Commission of inquiry - The warden of Llanfaes was appointed by Archbishop Pecham to join a commission of inquiry to investigate the repair of churches damaged during the Edwardian wars. [1 source]
1382Burial - Iolo Goch mentions the burial of Goronwy ap Tudor of Penmynydd at Llanfaes - 'the half-naked friar'. [1 source]
c.1401Abandoned - The friary suffered during the troubles at the beginning of the fifteenth century and was said to have been deserted in 1401. [2 sources]
1414Reconstitution - The friary was allegedly deserted from 1401, as a consequence of its involvement in the troubles at the start of the fifteenth century, but the house was reconstituted in 1414.  [2 sources]
1538Dissolution - The friary was dissolved in 1538. At this time there were four friars at Llanfaes. [2 sources]
+ 4 minor events. Show minor events

People associated with this site

Llywelyn ab Iorwerth; Llywelyn Fawr , prince of Gwynedd (founder)

Bibliographical sources

10 Printed sources

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7 On-line sources

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Archival sources

British Library, 'The Bible of Brother Gervase of Bangor', (Document), (View website)

Anglesey, OS Grid:SH6091677341
View site details on COFLEIN (RCAHMW database)[new window]


 
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